As the leaves begin to change colors, only a few months remain to explore the outdoors. To help get you started, here are a few suggestions for the best free places to visit this fall.

  1. The Boston Public Garden was the first public botanical garden in the U.S. and has been attracting visitors since 1837. Near downtown Boston, anyone traveling to this epicenter of East Coast culture should take a detour through the gardens.

  2. For those in the Southern regions, getting to see the wildlife is always a plus, and at Manatee Park in Fort Myers, FL, families can walk by the beach and see these wonderful animals in their natural, un-caged environment.

  3. To fully experience the Midwest, everyone must see the Mississippi River with its autumn colored trees along the banks. Fort Snelling State Park in Minnesota has beaches, forests, lakes, and a view of the Mighty Mississippi.

  4. If you’re lucky enough to find yourself in Hawaii this Fall and are looking for an adrenaline rush, look no further than Kahekili’s Leap. This 80-foot cliff jump into the ocean is both stunningly beautiful and heart-wrenchingly dangerous. Prove your worth, as the old Samoan warriors did by taking the plunge.

  5. For the cyclists amongst us, the Arizona Canal Path is one ride you won’t quickly forget. Taking you from the mall to unpaved deserts, it is a rollercoaster of 70 miles. Just don’t forget your water and Eat Your Coffee bars!

  6. While not for the faint of heart, hiking the Kelso Dunes in Mojave National Preserve will provide the reward of a spectacular Californian sunset after a day of trekking the sand dunes.

  7. The less famous of the mountain carvings, Stone Mountain Park in Georgia nonetheless offers incredible sights and a truckload of family activities.

  8. Although Texas might be known for its blistering summers, their pumpkin patches are a sight to behold every fall. Sweet Berry Farm offers all the usual amenities of the more expensive patches, but at a discounted price of free, making this an ideal date.

  1. Vermont may not be known for its mountains, but Mount Mansfield, the state’s highest point, is no easy trail. Reaching an elevation of 4393 feet, this is a must for anyone in the Northeast.

  2. While rock climbing may be associated with mountain states, Beacon Rock outside of Portland, OR is a challenge for both amateurs and experienced climbers.

Written by: Arius Liuzzi for Eat Your Coffee